What do you do when your girlfriend or boyfriend is a slut?

A new study has found that women are more likely to cum while in sexual relationships than men are.

A team of researchers led by Dr Rebecca O’Brien from the University of Queensland found that those in relationships were more likely than in monogamous relationships to ejaculate when their partner was in the throes of orgasm.

“In our study, the relationship was monogamous,” Dr O’Connor said.

“We found that for women, they did the same as if they were not in a relationship at all.”

Dr O�Connor said her team was not surprised to find that relationships were less sexually stimulating for women.

“In the study, we saw that the relationships were the least stimulating of the relationships, which are often seen as less sexually rewarding for women,” she said.

The research was published in the Journal of Sex Research.

“Women are much more likely [to orgasm] when they are in a partner’s lap, on top of them, than when they’re sitting, in their bed.”

Dr Olivia Roddin, a psychologist from the Queensland University of Technology, said the research showed that women were less satisfied in their relationships than they were in monogamy.

“The findings from this study show that women in relationships are not happy with their relationships, but there’s nothing they can do about it,” she told news.com.au.

“Our studies show that the women in the study are not having orgasms.

They are having feelings of frustration, and that can be a real issue in relationships.”

Dr Roddine said that the studies findings had important implications for the way we understand relationships and sexual behaviour.

“Relationships can be problematic for women if the partner is a passive provider, like a teacher or a mother, but they’re more problematic if the other person is more sexually active,” she explained.

“It’s about understanding who’s really at fault, not blaming the other party, and asking questions about what’s going on with their relationship.”

Dr Zafar Ahmad, a professor of psychology at the University and a member of the Queensland Research Council’s Sexuality Research Working Group, said women were often reluctant to discuss the way they felt about their relationships.

“They might think it’s a private thing they don’t want to discuss,” Dr Ahmad said.

Dr OConnor said that women might feel like they were being “whipped up” when they had sex, but this was not the case.

“One of the things that was interesting about the research was that it was done in couples,” Dr Roodin said.

“This is something that’s very hard to understand, but if we can make people understand that it’s not about the relationship, but about what the partner wants, then they’ll be less likely to do it.”

Dr Ahmad added that sexual desire and sexual satisfaction could be linked to a person’s sexual behaviour, and could help determine whether or not a relationship would last.

“So it’s really important that we have a better understanding of how the mind and the body works,” he said.